[[ PDF / Epub ]] ✅ A Preface to Morals Author Walter Lippmann – Marjoriejane.co.uk


A Preface to Morals explained A Preface to Morals , review A Preface to Morals , trailer A Preface to Morals , box office A Preface to Morals , analysis A Preface to Morals , A Preface to Morals 0486 Lippman, A Pulitzer Prize Winning Political Columnist, Helped Found The Liberal New Republic Magazine His Writings There Influenced Woodrow Wilson, Who Selected Lippman To Help Formulate His Famous Fourteen Points And Develop The Concept Of The League Of Nations A Preface To Morals Endorses Liberal Democracy Partial Contents Part I The Dissolution Of The Ancestral Order Part II The Foundations Of Humanism And Part III The Genius Of Modernity

  • Paperback
  • 356 pages
  • A Preface to Morals
  • Walter Lippmann
  • English
  • 09 September 2018
  • 0766195589

About the Author: Walter Lippmann

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Preface to Morals book, this is one of the most wanted Walter Lippmann author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “A Preface to Morals

  1. says:

    Lippmann who was an important American intellectual in the early half of the Twentieth Century but has now almost entirely been forgotten penned this impassioned and well thought out primer for his favored brand of Humanism, a doctrine that might provide a livable code and spiritual comfort for those who like Lippmann were disillusioned and disturbed by both the atheistic, sanguinary, and destructive fervor of the Marxist revolutionary movements and the empty, purposeless gnawing within the broa Lippmann who was an important American intellectual in the early half of the Twentieth Century but has now almost entirely been forgotten penned this impassioned and well thought out primer for his favored brand of Humanism, a doctrine that might provide a livable code and spiritual comfort for those who like Lippmann were disillusioned and disturbed by both the atheistic, sanguinary, and destructive fervor of the Marxist revolutionary movements and the empty, purposeless gnawing within the broad swath of liberal scions of the Enlightenment or the Progressive brand of society shapers Whilst admitting that such as he could no longer feign belief in the Christian God, Lippmann sought to provide a means to deal with the spiritual rawness left by such agnosticity without succumbing to nihilism or receding into reaction the result is this tome, propounding the transference of an ethos and the finding of a meaning for life within a dedication to humanistic principles in other words, agreeing to make man the measure of all things within the boundary lines of a pseudo secular progressive liberalism, and seeking therein a surcease on suffering by attuning oneself to the immanence of a brotherhood rather than the transcendence of an unknowable and distant Absolute Lippmann s earnest offering is not a solution I can fully get behind, but it offers up a humane and reasonable prospect for those who fear the onrushing of the Hollow Men something that might fill that interior void beyond a violent rearrangement of society in pursuit of either a purifying ideal or a cleansing regression As with much of what he wrote, Lippmann provides the reader with thoughtful, interesting and, at times, moving material

  2. says:

    Walter Lippmann was an influential journalist and political theorist of the twentieth century A Preface to Morals, his most well known and influential book, was first published in 1929 I was introduced to Lippmann in the late sixties when the Time Reading Program included this book in its offerings In it Lippmann argues that in modern society traditional religious faith has lost its power to function as a source of moral authority He asserts that ancient religious doctrine is no longer relev Walter Lippmann was an influential journalist and political theorist of the twentieth century A Preface to Morals, his most well known and influential book, was first published in 1929 I was introduced to Lippmann in the late sixties when the Time Reading Program included this book in its offerings In it Lippmann argues that in modern society traditional religious faith has lost its power to function as a source of moral authority He asserts that ancient religious doctrine is no longer relevant to the conditions of modern life governments have become increasingly democratized, populations have moved from rural to urban environments, and tradition in general is not suited to the dictates of modernity Further, the democratic policy of the separation of church and state has created an atmosphere of religious tolerance, which suggests that religious faith is a matter of preference In addition, the development of scientific method has created an atmosphere of doubt as to the claims made by religious doctrine That doubt has grown larger over the last fifty years.Lippmann offers humanism as the philosophy best suited to replace the role of religion in modern life He notes that the teachers of humanism are the wise men or sages, such as Aristotle, Buddha, Confucius, Plato, Socrates, and Spinoza, and that it is up to the individual to determine the value of their wisdom He goes on to observe that one of the primary functions of religion is to teach the value of asceticism, or voluntary self denial, as essential to human happiness Lippmann describes an attitude of disinterestedness as essential to the development of a humanistic morality Disinterestedness, for Lippmann, is an approach to reality that puts objective thought before personal desire He claims that the role of the moralist in modern society is not, as in traditional religions, to chastise and punish but to teach others a humanistic morality that can fulfill the human needs traditionally filled by religion

  3. says:

    Classic study of secular morality.

  4. says:

    The unlovely quality of much modern religiosity is due to these doubts So much of it s belief is synthetic It is forced, made, insisted upon, because it is no longer simple and inevitable The angry absurdities which fundamentalists propound against evolution are not often due to their confidence in the inspiration of the Bible They are due to lack of confidence, to doubt resisted like an annoying tune which a man cannot shake out of his head For if the militant fundamentalists were utter The unlovely quality of much modern religiosity is due to these doubts So much of it s belief is synthetic It is forced, made, insisted upon, because it is no longer simple and inevitable The angry absurdities which fundamentalists propound against evolution are not often due to their confidence in the inspiration of the Bible They are due to lack of confidence, to doubt resisted like an annoying tune which a man cannot shake out of his head For if the militant fundamentalists were utterly sure they are right, they would exhibit some of that composure which the truly devout display Did they really trust their God, they would trust laws, politicians, and policemen less But because their whole field of consciousness is trembling with uncertainties they are in a state of fret and fuss their preaching is frousy, like the seductions of an old coquette Walter Lippmann, A Preface to Morals, 1929 , pg 57

  5. says:

    A Preface To Morals by Walter Lippmann 1929 The reader this book addresses is a skeptic of any theistic fundamentalist religion which prescribes morality In Part I, Lippmann does comment occasionally on problems that a fundamentalist view of Christianity has for him, but primarily he tries to show the skeptic the moral consequences of a rejection of fundamentalist faith He is not satisfied with liberal theological solutions In Part II, he advocates humanism based upon science Part III inclu A Preface To Morals by Walter Lippmann 1929 The reader this book addresses is a skeptic of any theistic fundamentalist religion which prescribes morality In Part I, Lippmann does comment occasionally on problems that a fundamentalist view of Christianity has for him, but primarily he tries to show the skeptic the moral consequences of a rejection of fundamentalist faith He is not satisfied with liberal theological solutions In Part II, he advocates humanism based upon science Part III includes an interesting discussion of the impact of birth control on sexual and marital relations since birth control probably radical at the time and concern about the political ramifications of our mass society.His arguments are thorough and careful, at times long winded about 300 pages , but I found them very thought provoking and helpful in clarifying, consolidating and reinforcing my own views I highly recommend this book for those who have rejected a fundamentalist religion

  6. says:

    I read excerpts of this book from which my father sat down and typed out about 16 pages of the text as some of it resonated deeply with his own thoughts on wrestling with ideas on humanism and morals, philosophy and religion Perhaps it was in the 1980 s that I received this in the mail from him.Later i picked up the book in a used bookstore and browsed trhough ab itof it myself.The basic point I believe is be good to one another and do the right thing Not a bad idea.I am not sure he spec I read excerpts of this book from which my father sat down and typed out about 16 pages of the text as some of it resonated deeply with his own thoughts on wrestling with ideas on humanism and morals, philosophy and religion Perhaps it was in the 1980 s that I received this in the mail from him.Later i picked up the book in a used bookstore and browsed trhough ab itof it myself.The basic point I believe is be good to one another and do the right thing Not a bad idea.I am not sure he specifies what those right things are exactly it has been years since I looked through this book.It is a respectable effort at making his point and has something to offer though perhaps not having all the answers for everyone Basicallya fine, conscientious effort

  7. says:

    I read this book right out of college at about 22 23 years old I didn t understand all of it at the time, but it got me started down the path of radical atheism It s a tough read, but I recommend it to those serious about moral atheism It was written in the 30 s, but is still startlingly relevant.

  8. says:

    To be fair to Lippman, perhaps this book read as a revelation in 1929 when it was first published Butthan 80 years later, his call to humanism, and his portrayal of the failure of the traditional source of morality for most people, are old hat But the book is also repetitious perhaps for the same reason perhaps he felt it necessary in 1929 to pull out all the armory.

  9. says:

    Amazingly relevant, given that it was written in the 1920s I suppose that s because the moral underpinnings that Lippmann focuses on derive from reflections on human nature, which hasn t changed much, if at all Very well written.

  10. says:

    I find Walter Lippman intriguing, insightful, and deeply disturbing This is an interesting view of history after WWI and the effects of Modernism.

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