[Ebook] ➥ Imperial Spain: 1469-1716 By J.H. Elliott – Marjoriejane.co.uk


  • Paperback
  • 448 pages
  • Imperial Spain: 1469-1716
  • J.H. Elliott
  • 09 July 2017
  • 9780141007038

10 thoughts on “Imperial Spain: 1469-1716

  1. says:

    The book runs from the marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella down to the death of the dynasty with Charles II, the last stunted sprig of a degenerate line as Elliot describes him on account of the Spanish Hapsburg s bad habit of marrying uncles to nieces or first cousins, or sometimes both at the same time because the genealogy got complicated That unfortunate young man seems to have only enjoyed shooting at birds He was married twice but fathered no children, whether this was due to the poor state of sex education for royal couples or the extent of his disabilities remains unknown.The picture emerges of a disparate, personal union of Spanish states the dynastic union of Castile and Aragon itself the union of Catalonia,Aragon, Valencia the Balearic Islands achieved by the marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castle at the beginning of this book exploited for money and manpower to support the ambitions of, and challenges to, Hapsburg authority who won it all in the inheritance lottery in the person of Charles, Duke of Burgundy etc, etc The constant need for ready cash and oc...


  2. says:

    Already by the end of the sixteenth century many Spaniards seem to have been gripped by that sense of fatalism which would prompt the famous pronouncement of a Junta of theologians in the reign of Philip IV Summoned to consider a project for the construction of a canal linking the Manzanares and the Tagus, it flatly declared that if God had intended the rivers to be navigable, He would have made them so. For Anglophone readers interested in the history of Spain, this book is invaluable Elliott has here accomplished a real feat of research, of writing, and of analysis The book ably navigates that forbidding passage between simplifying popular accounts and unreadable scholarly monographs, managing to be both a work of serious intellectual synthesis and an absorbing account of Spain s history.Elliott has an astounding ability to seamlessly combine many disparate threads into the same narrative He pays close attention to economic history crop yields, interest rates, inflation and deflation, the debasement of currency, the balance of trade, tariffs and regulations He incorporates social and cultural shifts changing religious attitudes, demographic trends, class tensions, intellectual movements And yet he also does not neglect the outstanding individuals Ferdinand and Isabella, Charles V, Philip II, the ...


  3. says:

    The lack of natural advantages appears crippling Yet, in the last years of the fifteenth century and the opening years of the sixteenth, it seemed suddenly, and even miraculously, to have been overcome Spain, for so long a mere geographical expression, was somehow transformed into an historical fact H ow does this same society lose its impetus and its dynamism, perhaps in as short a period of time a it took to acquire them Has something vital really been lost, or was the original achievement itself no than an enga o an illusion as seventeenth century Spaniards began to believe In some ways, this book was exactly what I was looking for J.H Elliot sets out to specifically answer a question about which I have long pondered How is it that Spain rose to be one of the dominant and richest powers of Europe and then lost that position, never to get it back I have read other books which alluded to the question, but did not directly respond to it The history begins with the first steps toward unification sort of of the two kingdoms of Aragon and Cas...


  4. says:

    I recently was looking for something to read and realized my understanding of Spanish history pre Civil War was light on the details, so off to to look at what s out there.Man That s a thin field to pick from.Hugh Thomas histories of High Imperial Spain seemed to have the most noise online about them, so I grabbed one and started reading. meh Celebrity biography masquerading as history I don t need seven paragraphs on the bloodlines of a minor court functionary, thanks, and it s some serious Big Man history that spends next to no time on economy of social, so I put that volume aside.The only other general survey that seems to exist in English AND in e book format is this one, J.H Elliott s Imperial Spain So I grabbed that.I tend to lean towards very recent history as there has been a lot of new source material and re examination going on in a lot of historical fields, particularly since the fall of the USSR and, as regards Spain, the post Franco era That said, this book originally dates from the 70 s, I believe, but you wouldn t know it from the reading The author is clear to note that he considered his research source challenged for a var...


  5. says:

    No wonder Elliott scooped a knighthood given this tour de force My interest in Spanish imperial history was partly forged at A Level but became an obsession after a visit to Madrid s Prado Vel zquez s pictures depict the declining fortunes of the Habsburg family tree, riven as they were by the inbreeding resultant from ill judged marriages to cousins, nieces and nephews, declining fortunes on the battlefield and a particularly macabre vein of Catholicism all agonised crucifixions and obsession with Protestant heresy As Elliott himself suggests by the time of the weakling monarch Carlos II, the royal family s fortunes had started to resemble a comic opera.But this is no Jenny Bond style portrait of Kings and Palaces the social and economic background to modern Spain is portrayed and the vast differences between its constituent parts emphasized The roots of Catalan Castilian enmity are ...


  6. says:

    A decent overview of Spain under the Hapsburgs and the lead up to it Spain under Ferdinand and Isabella It touches on political structure, economic tendencies, and religious currents, and pays special attention to the push pull tension between uniting Spain and other Hapsburg dominions into a unified whole and preserving the rights and customs of each region It reads pretty well overall, but probably could have used a bit of a heavier emphasis on the political narrative and possibly a bit detail for Spain s apparently perpetual financial woes I m not much of an economist, and I was feeling a bit lost on occasion The persistent emphasis on nationalism seemed a little overplayed to me as well, though I don t know all that much about Spain.It s also vaguely racist at times Elliott seems to be a huge fan of th...


  7. says:

    I guess I m not as familiar with Spanish history as I thought I was I found myself getting confused as to the geography political as well as physical It s amazing to think of the territory that was ruled by the Habsburgs during the time Elliot s main interest, of course, is Spain itself or ra...


  8. says:

    This is a very readable account of Spanish history from the period from the union of Aragon and Castile to the end of the War of Spanish succession The focus is on mainland Spain this is not a history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas, and, though it touches on Spanish involvement in Flanders and the Netherlands and in Italy, it does so primarily only insofar as this involvement affected metropolitan Spain.The book covers the rise of Spain as an imperial power and its catastrophic decline All the main aspects of history are discussed political, constitutional, military, economic, demographic, religious, social, ethnic and cultural In style it is magisterial in a way which may seem a little old fashioned today it is none the worse for that it was first published in 1963, and the slightly revised paperback edition I have read dates from 1970 There are hugely enjoyable pithy sentences that would have been worthy of Edward Gibbon who wrote The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.I am sure that recent research would have led J H Elliott to modify some of the detail, but that the basic story would be largely unchanged of a Spain which had ambitions beyond its resources, which proved unable to tackle its constitutional problems and bring together the different regions of the country, of intellectual and commercial stagnation, of a lack of the vision to change in th...


  9. says:

    As a 6th generation Texan of Spanish descent on my mother s side , I have always identified myself culturally with the Tex Mex culture of South Texas where I am from I read this book because while I consider myself a history buff, I had never studied about my Old World roots.This book gives a great descriptive almost lifelike overview of Spain from 1469 1716 I ll admit, the first 25 30 pages start out slow and seem cumbersome but once it gets to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, it becomes really interesting and you won t want to put it down It serves as a good introduction to Spanish history you don t have to know a lot about Spain beforehand My favorite portion of the book was that of the Spanish Inquisition I am sure you have pre conceived notions about what went on but this book clarifies what actually occurred and shatters a few myths about the Inquisition While there is a slight Anglo Saxon bias, I found it to only be subtle I d be hard pressed to find a better overview and introduction to Spanish history in this time period than this one.While reading, I found myself delving into the specifics of locations , battles and people mentioned in the book This opens up even subjects to study For example, there are whole books on King Philip II, but you get a good summary of what he did while in power in the book.If you are looking for a catalyst to get started learning about the history of Spain then this book is for you Or if you are li...


  10. says:

    Was really impressed how easy the book was to read, although it wasn t too scholarly I feel like it belonged in the classroom, not on my bookshelf Not enough analysis Maybe I m just spoiled with how much I have read on this topic This does not take away from Elliot s wr...


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Imperial Spain: 1469-1716characters Imperial Spain: 1469-1716, audiobook Imperial Spain: 1469-1716, files book Imperial Spain: 1469-1716, today Imperial Spain: 1469-1716, Imperial Spain: 1469-1716 d8235 The Story Of Spain S Rise To Greatness From Its Humble Beginnings As One Of The Poorest And Most Marginal Of European Countries Is A Remarkable And Dramatic One With The Marriage Of Ferdinand Isabella, The Final Expulsion Of The Moslems And The Discovery Of America, Spain Took On A Seemingly Unstoppable Dynamism That Made It Into The World S First Global Power This Amazing Success However Created Many Powerful Enemies And Elliott S Famous Book Charts The Dramatic Fall Of Habsburg Spain With The Same Elan As It Charts The Rise.


About the Author: J.H. Elliott

Sir John Huxtable Elliott, FBA, who normally publishes as J H Elliott, is a historian of sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe specialising in Spanish history.He is Regius Professor Emeritus at Oxford University, Honorary Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford and Trinity College, Cambridge, Fellow of the Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford, and holds Honorary doctorates from the Aut